Gravity


Gravity, in the context of fermenting alcoholic beverages, refers to the specific gravity, or relative density compared to water, of the wortor must at various stages in the fermentation. The concept is used in brewing and wine making industry. Specific gravity is measured by a hydrometer, refractometer, pycnometer or oscillating U-tube electronic meter. – wikipedia

“Gravity is the building block of the universe. Among the basic forces (nuclear, electro-magnetic & gravity), gravity acts on “mass”. Living organism without “mass” cannot be imagined.” – ideaconnection.com In other words, Gravity is not just an outside force that is separate from us, it is intrinsic to our very existence. Although we rarely notice it until we try to break it’s laws, gravity has played a pivotal role in Human evolution. Sometimes called the invisible foundation, gravity affects all of biology from cell division, to re-production to blood pressure. And it doesn’t just affect animals, it affects our entire food system. Of all of the risks and difficulties associated with space travel, I imagine food to be the biggest obstacle to long term space expeditions.

ADF is also developing food for Mars expeditions—a task with some especially big challenges. A round-trip voyage to the red planet takes a full year, and astronauts are expected to spend at least 18 months there, for a total of two and a half years beyond Earth’s atmosphere. The estimated food required for a two-year journey for a team of six astronauts would literally weigh down the shuttle if you tried to take it with you, says Joseph Marcy, a food science specialist at Virginia Tech. So it will be essential for the crew to grow and cook some of its own food at the Mars space station.

With this in mind, ESA has selected nine ingredients that could be grown in greenhouses on Mars: spirulina, rice, onions, tomatoes, soybeans, potatoes, lettuce, spinach, and wheat. Ducasse has developed recipes that could be made with these things, including “Martian bread” with green tomato jam, potato and tomato mille-feuilles, and gnocchi made from spirulina algae. ADF still has plenty of time to perfect the recipes, though—the ESA’s first manned mission to Mars is scheduled for 2033. – From chow.com

Earth’s gravity is about 2.6 times greater than that of Mars. And Mars has two moons, which exert different gravitational pressures, in different patterns, on the planet. Since we know that the gravitational forces of the moon and the timing of it’s orbit is closely associated with other bio rhythms such as tides, seasons and re-production and gestational cycles, we have to assume that food stuffs grown on Mars will be radically different from things grown here.

As we enter into space, our ancient myth’s that provide a world view of everything being interconnected may serve us better than scientific deconstructionism. It is likely that we will have to send, not just crop plants, but entire food systems into space. We may once again begin to fully understand the importance and association of the moon goddess in agricultural cycles, or the deeply intimate connections of life and death and decay. Myths become superstitions when they are no longer associated with the natural cycles of life. They lose their potency. This is why religion – which is so strongly based in our food systems – has become invalid or misunderstood by most of it’s followers in our industrialized society. It is one reason why cultures which go through rapid industrialization also go through a social and spiritual crisis, often resulting in famine. Our primary myth in throughout most of the worlds religions is one of leaving the garden.

Something so scientific as Mars Mission may, ironically, one day bring us back to our mythic roots. It’s not likely that Mars Mission will have burgers and fries, but, like the beginnings of human civilizations here on earth, they might start with beer and bread. And, perhaps, a nice piece of fruit.

069-304x306

Chocolate Mint Banana Bread

(This is not quite like it sounds.  It is actually made with an herb called Chocolate Mint. Which, I might add, I recently planted in my garden and found out that it also goes very well with roasted fennel and goat cheese pizza.)

BananaBread_use-480x320

  • 1/2 cups butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup bananas
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/8 cup chopped chocolate mint
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, banana, and vanilla.

Add flour, soda, salt, chocolate mint, and nuts. Mix well.

Bake for about an hour. A knife inserted in the middle should come out clean.

Freezes well. Amount of mint can be adjusted for taste.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s