Least Complicated


I sit two stories above the street
It’s awful quiet here since love fell asleep
There’s life down below me though, the kids are walking home from school

So long ago when we were taught
That for whatever kind of puzzle you got
You just stick the right formula in, a solution for every fool

I remember the time when I came so close to you
Sent me skipping my class and running from school
And I bought you that ring cause I never was cool

What makes me think I can start clean-slated?
The hardest to learn was the least complicated

So I just sit up in the house and resist
And not be seen until I cease to exist
A kind of conscientious objection, a kind of dodging the draft

Boy and girl are holding hands in the street
And I don’t want to but I’ll think you just wait
It’s more than just eye to eye; learn things I could never apply

Oh I’m just a mirror of a mirror of myself
All the things I do
And the next time I fall I’m going to have to recall
It isn’t love it’s only something new

I sit two stories above the street
It’s awful quiet here since love fell asleep
There’s life down below me though, the kids are walking home from school

What makes me think I can start clean-slated?
The hardest to learn was the least complicated

By Emily Saliers – Indigo Girls

_______________________________________________________________

Like love, real food should not be complicated. There are certainly plenty of Wolfgang Puck’s, fancy chef’s, and pretentious restaurants with tiny servings on clean white plates that took hours to make which could lead one to believe that this is what being a real cook is all about.

Like love, real cooks deal with the every day, not just the fancy-date-night service.

Like love, real cooking is about the comfort and delight of sustenance. That which sustains you. It is a commitment to learning how to find both a zen like peacefulness and adventurous, new combinations in your every day life.

Like love, real cooking is not so glamorous and real cooks use not so glamorous foods like chickpeas.

Spicy Falafal (from BBC Good foods)

A few things you could add to this little sandwich: tomatoes; onions; greens; mint; yogurt; Maggi ketchup; Indian pickle; pickled vegetables; dried mango; chutney;  jalapenos; cilantro; cotija. You don’t need to be a gourmet chef to be creative. Add a few things to keep your relationship with the humble chickpea fresh and vital.

  • 2 tbsp sunflower or vegetable oil
  • 1 small onion , finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • can chickpeas , washed and drained
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander (or use more cumin)
  • handful parsley , chopped,
  • 1 egg , beaten

Heat 1 tbsp oil in a large pan, then fry the onion and garlic over a low heat for 5 mins until softened. Tip into a large mixing bowl with the chickpeas and spices, then mash together with a fork or potato masher until the chickpeas are totally broken down. Stir in the parsley or dried herbs, with seasoning to taste. Add the egg, then squish the mixture together with your hands.

Mould the mix into 6 balls, then flatten into patties. Heat the remaining oil in the pan, then fry the falafels on a medium heat for 3 mins on each side, until golden brown and firm. Serve hot or cold with couscous, pitta bread or salad.

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